Greater Manchester Low Carbon Hub. Delivering Greater Manchester's transition to a low-carbon economy

Manchester skyline by Graeme Cooper

Sustainability emerges as a core theme in the shared vision for Manchester's future

Launched by Sir Richard Leese at Manchester Central Library on Wednesday evening, the new strategy will guide priorities for the city up to 2025.

It follows on from a previous strategy produced in 2005, known as the Community Strategy, which has up until now been the go-to document for the city leaders. The new strategy has been shaped by a group called the Manchester Leader’s Forum. These are public, private and third sector leaders from across the city.

The strategy has been shaped by feedback from the public and partner organisations from across the city. More than 2,300 people and organisations contributed their views – the largest response the Council has ever had to a consultation process.

Sustainability priorities emerged as important during the consultation, with calls for a cleaner and greener city coming through strong

Sustainability priorities emerged as important during the consultation, with calls for a cleaner and greener city coming through strong, specifically with people voicing concerns over litter and the need to reduce carbon emissions. There were also calls for further transport improvements.

The new strategy comes at a key moment for Manchester as it aims to capture the opportunities which are emerging through devolution, increasing the momentum of a growing economy and ensuring no one is left behind.

The changing global climate also means that Manchester needs to adapt to become a low carbon economy.

Speaking at the launch, Sir Richard Leese, Leader of Manchester City Council, emphasised that the document was a strategy for everyone.

“This is not a strategy for the council, it’s a strategy for the city as a whole and achieving its ambitious vision relies on every one of us who live or work in the city”

“This is not a strategy for the council, it’s a strategy for the city as a whole and achieving its ambitious vision relies on every one of us who live or work in the city,” he said.

“We’ve made tremendous progress on many fronts towards the ambitions for a world-class city set out in the previous strategy, but on others it has been slower than we would have liked. What’s important is that we don’t let up and keep challenging ourselves to work for an even better city where everybody can share in success.”

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