Greater Manchester Low Carbon Hub. Delivering Greater Manchester's transition to a low-carbon economy

Future climate in focus as 2014 sets new record temperature

Yesterday NASA scientists, working with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), released fresh data that shows 2014 to have been the warmest year since records began in 1880.

In findings that kick into touch any lingering doubts over man-made climate change being a clear and pressing danger for the planet, NASA and NOAA said that the 10 warmest years in the instrumental record, with the exception of 1998, have now occurred since 2000. This trend continues a long-term warming of the planet, the scientists said.

Since 1880, Earth’s average surface temperature has warmed by about 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit (0.8 degrees Celsius), a trend that is largely driven by the increase in carbon dioxide and other human emissions into the planet’s atmosphere. The majority of that warming has occurred in the past three decades.

“This is the latest in a series of warm years, in a series of warm decades. While the ranking of individual years can be affected by chaotic weather patterns, the long-term trends are attributable to drivers of climate change that right now are dominated by human emissions of greenhouse gases,” said GISS Director Gavin Schmidt.

While the ranking of individual years can be affected by chaotic weather patterns, the long-term trends are attributable to drivers of climate change that right now are dominated by human emissions of greenhouse gases

So with the warming trend more than confirmed and with humankind firmly in the frame in terms of culpability, what will 2050 or 2080 for example look like for Greater Manchester and other Northern towns and cities?

This will be the focus of an event on 9 February organised by the Future Climate Forum, an initiative set up by Climate UK and the North West Climate Change Partnership.

Event outline

What does the current climate change trajectory mean for our towns and cities?
9 February 2015
17.00-19.30 including networking and refreshments
Manchester Central Library

You can book a place at any event by clicking here.  

The event is intended for organisations whose activity focuses on (but may not be exclusive to) Greater Manchester, Liverpool City Region, Cumbria, Lancashire, or Cheshire & Warrington, including local authorities, Local Enterprise Partnerships and Local Nature Partnerships, Government departments and academics, businesses, business networks, environmental regulatory organisations, environmental and sustainable development organisations.

The session will feature a keynote speech delivered by Jon Lovell, head of sustainability at Deloitte together with an overview of the future climate challenges and opportunities by Dr Jeremy Carter, Research Fellow from the University of Manchester.

Perspectives on what this means for our towns and cities including challenges, opportunities and progress to date will be provided by Charlie Baker, Red Coop, Jessica Bowles, Head of City Policy at Manchester City Council, Joe Ravetz , Co-Director of the Centre for Urban and Regional Ecology and Louise Newport, Scientific Policy Manager, UK Department of Health.

This will be followed by an opportunity for networking and reflections by Walter Menzies.

To register or to find further information, click here.

Visit the main Platform site